login   |    register
Flyhawk Model [ MORE REVIEWS ] [ WEB SITE ] [ NEW STORIES ]

In-Box Review
1700
HMS Naiad 1940
HMS Naiad 1940
  • move

by: Todd Michalak [ TRM5150 ]

HMS Naiad


HMS Naiad was one of sixteen Dido Class light cruisers commissioned by the Royal Navy prior to and late into the Second World War. Of these sixteen light cruisers, five would not make it until the end of the war; the Naiad being one of these. One of the first three ships of the Dido Class commission, HMS Naiad displaced around 6800 tons fully loaded and topped out at 485 feet in length.

After commissioning in late July of 1940, the Naiad would set sail with the Home Fleet from Scapa Flow regulated to convoy support and patrols in the North Sea. HMS Naiad would go on to further convoy escort support in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. In May of 1941, she would gain the status of flagship of the 15th Cruiser Squadron in Force H based in the Mediterranean. On the 11th of March, 1942 while assigned to Force B in the Mediterranean, the Naiad had responded for interception of an enemy convoy off Tripoli, she was sent searching for a damaged Italian cruiser. This would be the undoing of the HMS Naiad. Upon returning to Alexandria, the German U-565 submarine torpedoed the Naiad amidships. Capsizing almost immediately, HMS Naiad would surrendering to the damage within 35 minutes from the attack; losing between 77 and 86 (unclear accounting of casualties) of the 668 compliment of her crew.


The Kit


At first glance looking at the HMS Naiad 1940 kit from Flyhawk we see a small unassuming box colorfully decorated with art depicting the ship model contained within atop the top-opening box. From this point the unassuming part drops off. This kit actually comes in a box within box more or less. First off, the outer box can doubles as a display stand with a backdrop of the frontal box art if one so chooses. Inside the bi-fold lids to the box, we find another box along with a small blister pack with parts inside. Upon opening the secondary inner box the HMS Naiad 1940 kit is revealed. All of the parts look to be well packed making a nice visual presentation for the kit within. This seems to be a rather nicely appointed kit for the 1/700 scaling consisting of 259 styrene parts, photo etch and decals.

Contents

• 17 – Individually packed grey styrene parts
• 20 – Grey styrene sprues
• 1 – Metal counterweight
• 1 – Sheet of photo etch parts
• 1 – Decal Sheet
• 1 – Set of Instructions

Starting with the hull of the ship, the HMS Naiad 1940 kit comes with the option of having a full hull or waterline application. The lower hull is molded nicely and marries up to the upper hull section clean with a tight joint. The upper hull appears to have the correct bow angle and the surface details are crisp and indicative of what is seen on the original Naiad. If the waterline configuration is chosen, there is a bottom section with a metal counterweight insert provided to stabilize the upper hull.

The main deck of the ship comes supplied in two sections. The parts fit snug into the upper hull leaving no apparent gaps. The decking has been represented very well on the deck. Without knowing the exact configuration of the ribbing to the deck plating forward the breakwater at the bow, it does look to be a bit heavy in nature, but nevertheless crisply detailed.

With the kit of HMS Naiad they have nicely provided all of the superstructure sections in a specifically packaged. All of these superstructure build-ups are well defined and nicely detailed. There are no seam lines and the gate marks from the attachment points to the sprues are, for the most part, placed in locations where removal is not needed. There is one section of the upper deck where the attachment point falls in the middle of the deck itself. But this attachment point remnants are miniscule and should remove easily.

As seen with previously released kits from Flyhawk, the basic sprue layout is excellent. All of the parts a numbered clearly, crisply molded and free from flash. Flyhawk seems to have incorporated a streamline process to their 1/700 scale line of model ships. The larger sprue trees are specific to the depiction of this particular ship; however, there are several specially designed small square-shaped sprues containing the generic parts such as the Carly boats, ALO’s, searchlights and ammo deck boxes seen on other Royal Navy ships. This is the streamlined packaging allows Flyhawk the luxury of having a large majority of parts individually packaged ready for future releases of Royal Navy ships of all kinds. While some of the attachment points on these axillary parts look to be large, careful removal will render parts that have an amazing amount of detailing for this scale. There are thirteen of these 1.5 inch by 1.5 inch sprues contained in this kit making up the bulk of tiny additions to the kit. One of the more notable of these sprues for me is the crispness of the parts for constructing the 2-pounder Mark VIII’s and .50 Vickers AA guns. These guns molded in 1/700 scale are cleaner than most 1/350 scale kit offerings from what I can see. The possibility for barrel replacement is one option is there as well as attempting to drill out the barrels individually for a slightly more realistic look.

The largest sprue in the kit contains davits, gun platforms, range finders, breakwater and the two funnels for the ship. The funnels have some nice surface detailing to them; however, the caps are not open to allow for the hollow looking appearance. This can be achieved easy enough if so desired, by removing the centers, install the caps followed with small diameter rod for the inner piping.

The four remaining sprue trees contained in this set and are similar in nature to the small square generic sprue in that they can be added to several different Royal Navy ships. There are two different GB07 sprue trees contained in this kit, first one includes the QF 5.25 Mark I barrels and base mounts and the second contains the turrets themselves. The GB08 contains the triple torpedo launchers as well as the small Jolley boats for the ship. Both the torpedo tubes and launches are highly detailed. The H sprue contains winches and the delicately molded props and shafts for the ship.

Sprue A and B are the masts for the Naiad. These two sprues are separately packaged in a small blister pack partially for protection and in part for individualized packing of future kits. The masts are delicately made using slide-mold processing which renders a higher level of detailing. The only down side to the process is the attachment points especially in this scale. It would be best to take the extra time and care when removing these parts form the sprue.

One item Flyhawk has made a point in adding to their ship kits is a full complement of photo etch parts. This kit contains a nicely appointed set of photo etch including railings, ladders and stairs, radar and extremely delicate support brackets for various platforms. Included as well are four photo etch anchor chains. While flat in appearance, certainly would look the part once installed.

This kit contains a small decal sheet. This includes four ensign flags; two square and two designed to look as if they are waiving in the wind.

Flyhawk supplies a four-page, thirteen step instruction manual for this kit. The pages for the instruction are in a different configuration than typically seen with most kits whereas the each page is 7” x 20.5” in size. The drawings are in an exploded and 2D format with many key points including the photo etch are colored to make seeing and positioning easier. The painting and marking guide to the kit is located on the fourth page of the instructions. Color references for Mr. Hobby and Tamiya are given and the camouflage guide is in full color. The final section to the instructions shows how to manipulate the kits box into a display stand if so desired.

Conclusion

Flyhawk appears to have taken a firm grasp on detailing of their 1/700 scale ship models. The HMS Naiad 1940 kit is presented beautifully in the packaging and the layout to the parts is done extremely well. While some of the attachment points are large, which is kind of difficult to escape due to the scaling or the parts, all of the parts are finely detailed and molded with high quality. The added bonus of a complete set of photo etch parts to accommodate the kit is always welcomed. There are two minor issues I would make note of, one being the funnel caps not having a more hollow appearance and the 5.25 Mark I barrels, although nicely molded, do not have hollowed out muzzles. Drilling the barrels out is a quick and easy fix or the purchasing of aftermarket brass barrels in this scale the other.

The MSRP for this kit, of around $64.00 US, is just that, a "suggested retail price". A quick search around can find the kit for much less and in most case half that cost. At a price of around $30 to $35 US, this kit is an exceptional value for the quality and quantity you get inside the box!

Flyhawk Models seems to just be getting better and better, and in my opinion sits at the top of the pile when it comes to 1/700 scale styrene ship offerings. The details are amazing in this scale, the appointments to the kit are plentiful and the subject matter is very pleasing. I highly recommend the HMS Naiad 1940 to anyone; especially those interested in Royal Navy Cruisers.
SUMMARY
Highs: A finely detailed, well-appointed and very representative model kit of HMS Naiad. A great Value!
Lows: Minor attention to the opening up of the funnels caps and hollowing of the main armament is suggested.
Verdict: This is a fantastic 1/700 scale version of HMS Naiad with crisp detailing, sure to please any enthusiast of the subject.
Percentage Rating
97%
  Scale: 1:700
  Mfg. ID: FH1112
  Suggested Retail: $30 - $35 US
  PUBLISHED: May 28, 2015
  NATIONALITY: United Kingdom
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 95.50%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 89.57%

Our Thanks to Flyhawk Model!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

View Vendor Homepage  |  More Reviews  

Photos
Click image to enlarge
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
About Todd Michalak (TRM5150)
FROM: MASSACHUSETTS, UNITED STATES

I am building what I like, when I like and how I like it; having fun doing it. I have been building and finishing models on and off my whole life but the past ten years things really exploded. Just about anything goes when it comes to hitting the bench, but wrecked armor, rusted hulks, ships or ...

Copyright ©2018 text by Todd Michalak [ TRM5150 ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Model Shipwrights. All rights reserved.



Comments

Great looking Kit Todd, The detail looks better than some 1/350th kits. I could almost go back to 1/700th to build this, although, I think the scheme given with the kit may be inaccurate, he pattern looks right, but from my references the colours should be AP507B, P507Cand Black. Still great though, thanks for the review Todd, Cheers Si
MAY 28, 2015 - 12:18 AM
Flyhawk is really doing an amazing stuff with plastic. Thanks for the bit of information on the scheme. The was the only area I was having some trouble tracking down the info. There were limited pictures of the ship which does not help things...not to mention there are two books that bring up the color(s) of the ship (neither one I have btw) and they both contradict each other...LOL!! Personally I am good with both options...just which one? Flipping a coin!!
MAY 28, 2015 - 03:32 AM
I am incredibly impressed with Flyhawk. The finesse of the molding and the level of detail is amazing. The fit of the model I have built is excellent, too.
MAY 29, 2015 - 09:15 AM
That kit looks very promising and it has an under water part. Looks like a must have
MAY 29, 2015 - 11:40 AM
Exactly Fred! Just some top notch plastic! I will be sure to report on the fit as soon as I dig in on the kit! Bernd, it is nice to have that option of the full hull if someone needs it! For the price and the detailing, I do say this is a Must Have!
MAY 30, 2015 - 12:45 AM
Sometimes it seems, that i am doing "full hull" kits in this scale alone.
MAY 30, 2015 - 07:25 PM
Nothing wrong with that at all Bernd! I think with an increasing use of ships in watery dioramas, especially the larger scales, the waterline version makes for an easier application. With the 1/700, I don't se it making too much of a difference with or without the hull as the size is so small. With the small ships, I think the manufacturers should give at least the full hull. Not everyone goes after the diorama setting!
MAY 30, 2015 - 07:48 PM
The problem with waterline kits is most, the ship will sit too low in the "high seas" best is to cut down a full hull kit, at the right high. Flyhawk has done an interesting move, at the start of my business, i contacted them to have their products in my shop and i asked them, if they plan to do S.M.S Derfflinger as a full hull kit, they said no, nothing is planed, now they did it with this kit, so i still hope...and will probably get the Naiad. The presentation with this great looking box is a very nice idea too, i really like that
JUN 02, 2015 - 01:05 AM
You could glue styrene strip, just a few mm's in depth, to simulate a lower hull in a rough seas setting. It won't be an actual lower hull, but all you'll see is a bit of it below the waterline.
JUN 04, 2015 - 03:49 AM
We broke our quick reply box. Working on it. Until fixed go to topic to reply.
Thanks.
   

What's Your Opinion?


Photos
Click image to enlarge
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move