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General Ship Modeling
Discuss modeling techniques, experiences, and ship modeling in general.
Hosted by Todd Michalak
Build blog for Heller's HMS Victory
timmyp
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Virginia, United States
Joined: May 18, 2008
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Posted: Friday, November 06, 2015 - 12:40 PM GMT+7
Well hi all,
I've been talking about starting a build blog for this kit for some time, so I figured it was about time to get it started. And why not? I turned fifty-five today.

This blog is (hopefully) going to document the construction of the Heller's kit of HMS Victory, and I hope I can give enlightenment to any who is building, or is going to build, this kit. As a lot of people noted on my review of this kit, the instructions leave a fair amount to be desired. So if I can let people know of some of the pitfalls and workarounds I've found or used, then a big part of the purpose of this blog has been fulfilled.

The beginning

I've been working on my model since 2010 (the kit was bought in '07). A lot of that time has been spent on painting the hull, cannon carronades, and deck pieces. A lot of the other time was spent clearing my desk, and doing my income taxes!

I've seen a lot of forum posts about how this model kit somehow intimidates people. Myself, I like a big challenge! But if you've never built a sailing ship model before, Heller's Victory is not the place to start. Not only are there a lot of parts (more on that later), but the assembly sequence is a bit bizarre, and you'll find yourself scratching your head quite a bit when it comes to figuring out the rigging scheme. However, there is a belaying pin-to-rope diagram, so taking a few minutes to find where the end of the rope goes to on that diagram, will be helpful. Of course, the amount of painting that is done on this ship is astronomical - not only does the outside of the hull have to be painted, but the inside of the hull gets painted, as well as both sides of all the deck pieces. This is where you'll spend scads of time - trying to figure out, on the hull, the point where a black stripe ends and a yellow stripe begins. I used the box art and the instructions, and what might be some molded-in "lines" to determine what's black and what's yellow (or ochre, if you prefer). Plus, the inside of the hull, on the upper parts, there is the moldings that are to be painted black, against a yellow background. This is where you can get a bit nutty - I found myself constantly re-touching the black, because of some over-run of the yellow, then touching up the yellow, because of some over-run of the black. And the worst thing is, I'll be painting on this thing until after I think I'm finished with it.

About the parts quantity: It looks like Heller, in their finite wisdom, rather than try to get "x' number of similar parts molded on the same sprue, they just throw in two or three sprues with that same part. For instance, the ladders that lead from the main deck (or at least, what the U.S. Navy would nowadays call the main deck) down below, were all molded in black. However, rather than try to get all the ladders on the same sprue, I found that there is one ladder on 3 sprues. And I'm not sure I'll use all the parts on the rest of the sprues. So even if the box says there's some 1000+ parts, take it with a grain of salt. Besides, each cannon assembly has 6 parts: 6 times 100 (cannons) equals 600 parts. Boom - you just slashed the parts count by more than half.

And now, about the lacks of parts quantity: it really rubs me the wrong way that Heller didn't include any black thread for the standing rigging, let alone any kind of anchor cable. Of the rigging thread they do supply, it's in two diameters, and colored white. In the instructions, they tell you to run the thread through a cup of coffee to get it colored. They don't tell you if that should be black coffee, or cafe au lait, or Folger's or Starbucks. I couldn't see brewing a new cup of coffee each time I needed to color their thread. So I went to a Canadian company (www.castyouranchorhobbies.com) to get some various sizes of black thread for the standing rigging. I went looking for some various sizes of tan colored thread for the running rigging, but the sizes weren't what I was looking for. Then, as I was sitting out on the front porch, it hit me: why not get a brown Sharpie marker, and run the thread against it, to color the thread? So that's what I did. It turns the thread a dark brown, but I'll live with it. Besides, the box art shows some of the running rigging to be dark brown, so I can't be too far off the mark.

So, I know a picture is worth a thousand words, so I'll try to upload photos so that I can then post them into this blog. Unfortunately, I uploaded a bunch of photos earlier this today, but now, I don't see them in the gallery...maybe I was supposed to "process" the photos to get them to actually upload. So now, it's off to read the forum post about uploading photos and stuff.

Currently, I'm working on step 9 of the instructions - I just finished cementing all the cannons onto the deck, so now it's time to finish painting the fixtures (or columns, or stanchions, not sure what to call them), then the finish painting the upper deck (ha ha! "finish painting" ha ha!) and try to get that installed. The instructions say to spread the hull apart to get the upper deck slid into place, but I'm not sure how that's going to work out.

One thing about the paint I'm using: I'm using Tamiya acrylic paints. Usually I paint with enamels, but I wanted to do something different this time. For everyone who might build this ship in the future, use some kind of yellow ochre for the yellow color (I'm using Testor's Insignia yellow, in acrylic). The problem is, when you look at the hull from a distance, because it's flat black/bright flat yellow, it looks like some kind of industrial warning zone. So don't use too bright of a yellow. And the red I'm using, it's glossy red, not flat red. The brightness looks sharp, but the glossiness doesn't really belong on a warship. And of all these paints, it usually takes at least 2 coats to get good coverage, with at least 1 hour dry time between coats. So if you have a preference for type and brand of paint, feel free to go with it. I have found, however, by using acrylic paint, I can go to the craft store and buy a big bottle of gold colored paint for less than 2 dollars, and I use maybe 3 brushfuls of the stuff. I say that, because up on the bow, there is some scroll work that needs to be painted gold, and I can't see ponying up the 5 or 6 dollars at the hobby shop for a jar of gold paint that is a fraction of the size I got at the craft store.

So for the rest of the blog, things might seem a bit out of sequence, as I've put parts together while waiting for other painted parts to dry or something. So that's all for now, and I thank you for taking the time to read this blog.
Cheers,

Timmy P.
timmyp
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Virginia, United States
Joined: May 18, 2008
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Posted: Friday, November 06, 2015 - 01:15 PM GMT+7
Well, I was just fumbling through the process of uploading photos...it was bizarre! I found the pictures I had uploaded earlier today, but then, navigating around the kitmaker gallery, I lost them...plus, it seems that the best way to upload photos is to do it one at a time - when I try to do ten photos at a pop, nothing seems to actually get uploaded. Try, try, again!
TRM5150
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Posted: Friday, November 06, 2015 - 01:35 PM GMT+7
Hey Tim! Looking forward to seeing your victory come about! In the end, all that matters will be how much fun you have during he build! 00000000000000000000

I am not too sure about the whole bulk uploading of the pics, but if you copy the URL in the box labeled 'Linked Thumbnail' below the picture you want to ad, then paste it in the editing box here in your thread!
timmyp
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Posted: Saturday, November 07, 2015 - 12:31 PM GMT+7
So, I think I got the picture upload thing down pat, as I now see all the photos I've uploaded the past couple of days.

While this portion of the build is out of sequence, I just wanted to show some of the problems about how all the parts fit together. Here, I'm going to discuss and show the problems I had in fitting the "headpiece" (?) to the prow of the ship.

Here's a picture of the headpiece glued up:




So far, so good. Given the number of clothespins I used to hold it together, means I used my "mini" clothespins - they're about an inch and a half long.

So now, skipping ahead past some painting, here is how the headpiece fitted against the hull:



As you can (sort of) see, the "wings" of the headpiece don't fit against the hull. So I decided to try to "mold" the wings against the hull, using a candle to get the plastic pliable enough to bend. I wasn't 100% successful, but I got them close enough to the hull to where I'm happy.








However, once I glued the headpiece onto the hull, I found another problem: There was a big gap between the hull and the headpiece. In the photo below, the white strip of plastic is some filler I cut to fit into the gap:




And here's the filler on the port side:


And now, after painting:




So here, apropos of nothing, is a shot of the second cannon deck with the cannons in place:



And as long as I'm at it, here's what I went through to get the base made, and the hull attached to it:

So here is the construction of "the plinth", as the instructions call it - most everyone else will call it the base. It's made from cherry, and I had to glue two pieces together lengthwise to get close to the width that is called for in the instructions (and having to translate metric to English dimensions). I also put a Roman ogee profile on it, just to add interest. Good thing I have a decent wood shop!


And here it is after routing an edge on it:



And here's some pictures of the sawdust I created:







So once I got "the plinth" finished, it was time to screw the hull to it. In the next couple of pictures, is the process. I glued the stands to the hull before screwing them to the base - this made it really difficult to screw the screws in, but at least the distance between the two stands is accurate! I used a short nail to guestimate where the center of each hole would be. [Insert images Screw in place, screw in, screws partly in 2, screws partly in, tools to get the screws in, mounted].











So here are a few more pictures of the hull mounted to the plinth. In the next image, to make sure I had things oriented correctly, I had to remind myself of which side was for the bow:



And here's a couple shots, looking up at the hull. This first image just seems to me that Victory is still in drydock, getting built:







Here's a head-on shot of the bow. At this point, only the lowest gun deck has been installed.



OK, so that's about it for now - it's almost time to watch Ohio State play some football. Thanks for taking the time to check out my postings
TRM5150
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Posted: Saturday, November 07, 2015 - 03:17 PM GMT+7
Nice bit of work there Tim! Well done on the fix at the bow!
JJ1973
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Posted: Sunday, November 08, 2015 - 06:15 AM GMT+7
Tim,

from your explanations and your pictures I clearly get the impression that some modelers feel intimidated by this kit. That's certainly no kit for beginners!!

Great build log so far, I am looking forward to follow your progress.

Very nice work up to now! I wish you best of luck with your next level deck, the way Heller tells you it should be inserted makes me shiver a bit, I hope you manage without any damage to your build!!


Cheers,

Jan
timmyp
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Posted: Sunday, November 08, 2015 - 11:30 PM GMT+7
Thanks, Jan.

Yes, for the next deck that gets installed, I'm already thinking of ways to push the hull apart (push it apart gently!!) to get the deck in place. I've also been thinking about maybe applying some lubricant (like Vaseline) to the edges of the deck, and then push/pull the deck into the place.

I was reading the instructions today about getting the deck installed. Among other things, it says to apply glue to the tops of parts 92, 203, and 76 (of which there are ten),and have the deck rest on top of all those parts. The only problem is, you're supposed to paint the underside of the deck pearl gray, and with no way of knowing where those aforementioned parts line-up on the bottom of the deck, how do you know where to scrape off the paint so the glue will adhere? I think the solution here is just to have the top deck rest on top of all of those parts.

But all that is for the near future; I have to finish painting the lasst 5 pieces of part 76 (the painting takes about 5 minutes, drying time is another hour, and then another 5 minutes for more painting). And then I still need to paint the top deck, which will take about 30 minutes alone to paint, a day to dry, and then another 30 minutes or so to overcoat it. So maybe by the weekend I'll be starting to put the deck in place. Cheers!
RussellE
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Posted: Monday, November 09, 2015 - 09:23 PM GMT+7
A challenging build for sure Tim, but one I'm definitely watching!

Thanks For sharing!

Russ
TimReynaga
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Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 08:45 AM GMT+7
Looking good Tim! A suggestion if I may - if you are going to use that nicely routed wood base as your working platform as you proceed with the build, covering the edges with masking tape will save repairs of the bumps and nicks that will happen as you handle the model during construction.

I will be watching with interest!
timmyp
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Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 08:06 PM GMT+7
Hey Tim,

I'm way ahead of you - I covered the entire base in paper to prevent further damage! I had discovered that there was a sweat/water stain, as well as some spilled super glue on the base, and even some paint stains! so after sanding down the defects, I decided to cover the entire base so no further mishaps would occur. I guess in the next series of photos I post might show the base wrapped in paper.

Thanks for your input! It's definitely a word to the wise!
timmyp
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Posted: Friday, November 13, 2015 - 11:06 AM GMT+7
So today's postings are about the rudder, deck crossmembers, and making & installing "the loops".

Here's the images of the rudder. I took this photo the way I did, because I wanted to show how long the rudder is. And it was no picnic trying to paint this thing copper, on top of the red plastic.








Fitting the lowest gun deck. Several crossmembers are fitted before the deck is installed; unfortunately, not each crossmember fit correctly.


Here's a pic of the crossmember before trimming it to size:



Here are the crossmembers in place:







The two deck halves didn't fit well into the hull, and I had to do some shaving of the outer edges to make them fit. But once that was done, it left a gap down the center. Of course, with the other decks on top of this one, no one will ever know that there's a gap.


In the above image, the white stuff on the deck, coming out from the centerline, is masking tape that is used on the underside of the deck: I tried to line-up the deck with where the crossmembers are, and the tape is there so that I wouldn't paint the underside that would ultimately lay on top of the crossmembers. But I figured I should go ahead and practice filling the gap with putty, so even if it turns out to be a bad job, at least I'll get a little practice with the putty.

Here's the lowest deck before putty:


And here it is after putty & paint:



The white squares around the edge of the deck is where I've scraped the paint away in preparation of cementing the cannons in place (more about that later).

And now, what Heller simply calls the "loops": these are loops that attach to the...well, I'm not sure what they're called, but I'll say the loops attach to the chainplates, which in turn are attached to the deadeyes. Making of these loops is actually in step 1 of the instructions, but I didn't make them until the instructions called for them to be installed (which is step . After I started installing the loops, I got to thinking: does the length of the loop mean that is how far it should extend out from the hull, or does that mean how long the loop is, from where it attaches to the inside of the hull? IF it's supposed to be how far it extends from the hull, then all of my loops are at least 2 mm short (or whatever the thickness of the hull is). So anyway, here's the pix & text about it:

The instructions say to make a jig using cardboard. Of course, they don't suggest what kind or thickness of cardboard, so I used the following box cardboard:



The rectangular cut-out on the left is going to be the jig.

So here's pictures of the tool in use. The easy thing to do here was to make the longest loops first, cut off the appropriate width of cardboard for the next set of shorter loops, then do that again, and again, and again. Since each succeeding loop was bout 2 mm shorter than the previous one, it was pretty easy to get the lengths correct.







And now, some pictures of the loops installed:







So that's all for today's postings. I'll upload some pictures about the little device I made to locate the cannons on deck, and where to scrape the paint away so the cannons can be cemented to the deck. I have also found a "small" problem with fitting the stern gallery around the rudder post; more on that later. Right now, back to painting the upper most deck with a second coat of paint. And for those following along at home, I think I've come up with a way to widen the hull enough to get the top deck into place - right now, with one side fitted into the hull, the other side of the deck hangs about a quarter-inch over the hull. But more on that later.

Thanks for taking the time to read my musings! Comments (good, bad, ugly) are appreciated.

Timmy P.
JJ1973
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Posted: Sunday, November 15, 2015 - 05:34 PM GMT+7
Tim,

that'S quite a project!! It took me a second to realize that you put the rudder in front of an inch-scale...that really makes it BIG!

I have to admit that I haven't figured out the exact function of these loops yet, but that might well be due to my limited knowledge of technology and function of the ships of the line of that area...looks certainly like lots of work.

I hope you manage to install the next deck as you plan - fingers crossed!!

Looking forward to see more!

Cheers,

Jan
timmyp
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Posted: Sunday, November 15, 2015 - 11:18 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Tim,

that'S quite a project!! It took me a second to realize that you put the rudder in front of an inch-scale...that really makes it BIG!

I have to admit that I haven't figured out the exact function of these loops yet, but that might well be due to my limited knowledge of technology and function of the ships of the line of that area...looks certainly like lots of work.

I hope you manage to install the next deck as you plan - fingers crossed!!

Looking forward to see more!

Cheers,

Jan



Hi Jan,

Yes, the rudder IS big - 120.65 mm/4.75 inches. It's why I took pictures of it; I don't think I've ever seen a rudder that big.

Making those loops wasn't hard, but it was time-consuming, and finger-cramping! As I was doing all the assembly in step 8, I though I was cruising along pretty good, until I got the part about installing the loops (which were supposed to be made back in step 1!). So then, it was stop all assembly, make the loops, then get them installed. If I remember correctly, there's a total of 64 loops to be made.

So here's a word to the wise about getting the loops installed: as I was painting the hull, I saw that there were a lot of pre-formed holes in hull, which were obviously going to accept either a rigging line, or the post of a ring, or something. However, I also noticed that some of the holes weren't clear all the way through; I had to open them up. I used my X-acto blade to open the holes, and by doing that, some holes got opened up more than others (I should have used one of my drill bits to get a consistent hole size). The net effect was that for some loops, since the hole was just a bit too big, I had to tie some more knots in the loop, so I wouldn't pull the loop competely through the hull. And just to be sure everything stayed in place, all the loops were cemented to the hull (from the inside) with a drop of super glue. Another aspect of pulling the loops through the hull, was just trying to get the thickness of the thread into the hole initially, and then get it pushed through enough to where I could grab it on the outside of the hull and pull it through. And yes, sometimes I'd get a loop through the hole, but then let go of it with my tweezers, and watch it come sliding back out!

that was a long explanation, wasn't it?

I'm finishing up painting the topside deck; it's some fine details and touch-up that I've got to do. I think I decided on a way to spread the hull open enough to get the deck installed: I'm going to cut some lengths of wood to spread the hull enough to get the deck in place. However, there's only about 3 or 4 places I can put the wood spreaders in, and still get them out after installing the deck.

And there's another story about the rudder, but I'll discuss that in a later post.
timmyp
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Posted: Monday, November 30, 2015 - 05:00 AM GMT+7
Well, I thought I'd take a minute and talk a little about a jig I made, so that it would be easy to place all the cannons. I needed to make the jig so that I'd know where the cannon would be placed within the gunport, and also where to scratch off the paint on the deck so the glue would stick.

So here's a pic of the jig itself - it's made out of a tongue depressor.


And here's a pic where I'm checking the fit of the cannon:



And a pic without a cannon in place on the jig:


And here, the jig is placed against one of the lower decks:

And lastly, a picture showing the jig being used repeatedly:


Making this little jig really helped a lot when it came time to glue the cannons to the lower decks. After I got the cannons glued into position, I went back with some red paint and did a touch-up on the deck, where too much paint was scraped away. The sad thing is, no one will ever see the painted decks, as there isn't much light getting into those lower decks...I probably could have just skipped painting the decks, and saved myself a lot of time!

I don't know if I mentioned this elsewhere, but before I glued the cannon barrels to the carriage, I used a 1/16th inch drill bit, chucked in an electric drill, to drill-out each barrel, and get a consistent bore hole on the barrels. I did this before I glued the barrel to the carriage. I also used an emory board to smooth the front of the barrels (there were some burrs after drilling, as well as a little bit of mis-matching when assembling the barrels) and give them all a pretty consistent look.
TRM5150
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Posted: Monday, November 30, 2015 - 05:06 AM GMT+7
Nice work on the carriage...and the jig! Nothing like having the right duel purpose tool at hand to make your life easier!
timmyp
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Posted: Monday, November 30, 2015 - 05:31 AM GMT+7
So last weekend, I managed to fit the upper deck into the hull - no easy task! I didn't realize it as I was trying to squeeze the deck into place, but I broke part of the railing on the hull. I don't think I'll try to fix it, for fear of completely breaking that piece of railing away from the hull, but I might change my mind in the future.

After doing some test runs about how to get the deck into place, I came upon the idea of cutting some pieces of wood to the width of certain places on the deck - the bow and stern weren't too much of a problem, it was the middle part of the deck that was the problem. Here's a picture of the pieces I cut (well, they're Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF), not actual wood). I wrote on each piece where they line-up compared to the deck, so I wouldn't forget what goes where!


And here's a couple of pictures of the ship, before I put the top deck into place. I mostly just wanted to document the pillars that had been put in place, because I wasn't sure how much of them would be seen before the deck went into place. I scraped the paint off the top of these parts, in the event that I would be able to get some glue on them before the deck went in. It turned out, I didn't put glue on the top of these parts, because mostly, the time it took to get the deck in place would have probably dried out the glue, and there's a curvature to the deck, where it doesn't even really touch those parts.





And now, a pic of the deck in place:



I used the lower part of the foremast and mizzenmast to make sure the deck was aligned fore-and-aft. To get the deck in place, I first lined it up with one edge laying on the ledge that is molded into the hull, and then let the other edge hang over the hull. It was at this pint that I put the bow & stern blocks into place, to widen the hull some more. It turns out, I didn't use all the blocks I had cut, simply because there was too much overhang of the deck outside of the hull, and I had no where to put the block against to help widen the hull. I only used the bow & stern blocks, and I was able to get the deck in place to about 40%. I thought I was stuck in the process, when I had the brilliant idea to use a knife blade as a kind of lever, to push the hull out to get the deck to slide in to place. Well, it wasn't so much about getting the deck to "slide in to place", as it was "Dammit, this better work!". But use the edge of the deck as a levereage point, and pushing outwards on the hull from the inside with the knife blade, the deck suddenly popped into place. I probably broke the railing when I was using the knife.

Here's a view from the bow:


And from the stern:



And here's some different angles of the same thing:



In the image below, I scraped away the black paint on the crossmembes on the open area of the deck, as this is where the small boat holder things get glued in. Since the instructions don't have you put the boats in place until after the rigging is done, I figured now would be a real good time to clean the paint up!






Oh yeah, my two cents about masking tape: When I was painting the gratings and stuff on the top deck, I masked everything off with that blue tape from 3M. That stuff is really worthless. I had a lot of paint run off and underneath areas I had taped off, thus making me do a lot of back-and-forth touch ups between the deck color and the black/dark brown used on the gratings and stuff. So for me, I'm sticking with plain ol' masking tape in the future!
timmyp
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Posted: Monday, December 28, 2015 - 12:22 PM GMT+7
Haven't put a post in a while, mostly because I'm trying to finish an on-line "Introduction to Engineering Mechanics" course before the end of the year.

Been working on step 9 of the instructions (still!), so here are some thoughts & pictures. It seems I've run out of space on the kitmaker gallery, so images from now on are posted on photobucket.

Parts 88-206-187 & 188: These make up the ship's wheel. It's a little unclear how far the axle (206) is supposed to get into the wheel (either of part 88). There was also some molding marks, that if not removed, give you a false sense of how far the axle is supposed to be pushed into the wheel. The bottom line, make sure the small pins on the axle protrude far enough out of the wheel so they will fit into the upright parts (187 & 188).

The galley stack was mostly painted while still on the sprue; after the paint dried, I cut both parts off, cemented them together, and did touch-up painting. It fits a bit snug into place on the deck.

For parts 192-193-194-195, which are the mainstay bitts, again, I painted the bulk of these parts while still on the sprue, then assembled them, touch-up with paint, then cemented into position. A little hint: on the deck, try not to paint the area that is about a quarter-inch behind the slots that they'll fit into; it'll save you the later hassle of trying to scrape the paint off, as well as scraping off the wood-grain molded into the deck. In this picture, the bitts are the black upright parts in the foreground:

[IMG]http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i155/TimmyP_2006/HMS%20Victory%20step%209%20pictures/DSC00031.jpg" BORDER="0">[/img]




The binnacle housing (parts 384) and the binnacle: why in the world did Heller mold the housing in clear plastic? They really could have molded that in the light tan color that a lot of the other parts are molded in. Besides, the instructions say to paint the housing light brown, and the binnacle itself bronze (I used gold), so what's the point in making it a clear part? Also, this image (below) shows the cabin walls...I think Heller could have helped this process along by making yellow decals that are put on the cabin walls, instead of having to painstakingly mask & paint things. That way, I could have slopped the dark brown paint on the walls, and have the decals cover up the excess. Also, in the instructions, they have parts 229 and 228 backwards - part 228 is actually a port-side cabin wall, and 228 is a starboard-side wall.

[IMG]http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i155/TimmyP_2006/HMS%20Victory%20step%209%20pictures/DSC00034.jpg" BORDER="0">[/img]

The ship's bell, its supports, and the belfry (parts 120, 95 and 208) went together pretty well. When doing the painting of the bell supports, it's probably best to hold the part by the "foot", instead of the side with a pin. The foot side sits between the small bumps on the deck at the ship's waist. It is also worthwhile to see how the foot fits between those bumps; I had to do some filing to get the feet to fit snugly in between those bumps. And further note, the bell itself sits between the support structure, not on top of the crossmembers. So when painting, keep the inside of the crossmember free of paint; you can touch-up after getting the bell in place. Also, the holes in the deck that receive the pins were tight; 1-1/2 turns with the X-Acto knife took care of that. Once all that is completed, the belfry goes on top; in my initial test-fittings, it looked like the belfry would overhang a little bit on all 4 corners, both in front-to-back and side-to-side. However, when I put the belfry on, I though I had it centered, but it turns out, there's no overhang on the port side, and there's a lot of overhang on the starboard side. In this image below, we see the galley stack (foreward of the belfry) and the belfry:

[IMG]http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i155/TimmyP_2006/HMS%20Victory%20step%209%20pictures/DSC00033.jpg" BORDER="0">[/img]



I also finished painting & installing the beakhead bulkhead (part 344). Heller says to install it first, then "decorate" it as shown in the instructions. Hint to the wise: there is NO WAY you're going to be able to do a decent paint job on this part if you cement it in place before completely painting it.

[IMG]http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i155/TimmyP_2006/HMS%20Victory%20step%209%20pictures/DSC00032.jpg" BORDER="0">
[/img]

Just finished painting and cementing the weather cleats. Still painting part 35, of which there are 18, and they go around the main hatch opening in the deck. Have started painting the chain plates. The below pictures show where those weather cleats go, and after one has been positioned:

[IMG]http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i155/TimmyP_2006/HMS%20Victory%20step%209%20pictures/Weather%20cleat%20position.jpg" BORDER="0">[/img]

[IMG]http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i155/TimmyP_2006/HMS%20Victory%20step%209%20pictures/Weather%20cleat%20in%20position.jpg" BORDER="0">[/img]
timmyp
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Virginia, United States
Joined: May 18, 2008
KitMaker: 164 posts
Model Shipwrights: 163 posts
Posted: Monday, December 28, 2015 - 12:24 PM GMT+7
Crap! None of the images showed up. Any ideas, anyone? Like I said in previous post, I'm hosting the pictures on PHotobucket...what should I be doing here? I followed the same procedure as if kitmaker gallery was hosting my photos.

Thanks!!
berndm
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Niedersachsen, Germany
Joined: March 26, 2014
KitMaker: 842 posts
Model Shipwrights: 151 posts
Posted: Monday, December 28, 2015 - 10:14 PM GMT+7
Hello Timothy, a while ago i had a similar problem with Photo Bucket, they mailed me, that i have run out of bandwith and my pictures became invisible !
But after some time they were back.
Hope this helps

Bernd
timmyp
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Virginia, United States
Joined: May 18, 2008
KitMaker: 164 posts
Model Shipwrights: 163 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 01:55 AM GMT+7
Gruss Gott!

Thank you for your comments, Bernd. I think the problem is with how I tried to link the images from photobucket to this forum; looking through photobucket last night, I think they do things differently from the technique used for kitmaker gallery.

Vielen Danke, Auf Wiederschaun!
Tim
timmyp
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Virginia, United States
Joined: May 18, 2008
KitMaker: 164 posts
Model Shipwrights: 163 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 02:10 AM GMT+7
Hmmmm. Well, at least now, there's a link to the photos on my latest post!

Tim
berndm
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Niedersachsen, Germany
Joined: March 26, 2014
KitMaker: 842 posts
Model Shipwrights: 151 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 05:50 AM GMT+7
Guten Tag, Tim
....sounds familar, my start on Kitmaker / Aeroscale was a disaster, using Photobucket.
The pics were at first too big, than invisible, well....

I am really looking for new pics from your build, i did a lot of sailing ships in my youth, mostly from Revell and your build is really tasty to try it again.
Have a great day
Bernd
berndm
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Niedersachsen, Germany
Joined: March 26, 2014
KitMaker: 842 posts
Model Shipwrights: 151 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 05:51 AM GMT+7
Very nice pics and good progress
timmyp
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Virginia, United States
Joined: May 18, 2008
KitMaker: 164 posts
Model Shipwrights: 163 posts
Posted: Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 05:09 AM GMT+7
Grussti Bernd,

Thanks for your comments. Today, I just failed a quiz on my Engineering Mechanics course, so I'm pretty bummed out about that. In the meanwhile, though, I'm going to go to photobucket and read about how to post images from there to here...they apparently use different things, depending on if you're posting to a blog, a forum, e-mail, etc.
I'm at the point in step 9 of the instructions to add the chainplates, so I'll be doing that later this afternoon.

Stay tuned! More pictures will be forthcoming. Thanks for taking the time read my blog.

Tim

berndm
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Niedersachsen, Germany
Joined: March 26, 2014
KitMaker: 842 posts
Model Shipwrights: 151 posts
Posted: Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 09:04 AM GMT+7
Hi Tim sounds like one of "these" days good luck for your future plans and i am looking forward to your coming progress on this proud lady !

Bernd