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Research & Resources
Discuss on research, history, and issues dealing with reference materials.
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HMS Dreadnought question
Jabberwock
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United Kingdom
Joined: May 14, 2016
KitMaker: 1 posts
Model Shipwrights: 1 posts
Posted: Saturday, May 14, 2016 - 05:57 PM UTC
Have been lurking at the back of the room for a while now, snooping around and checking out what you guys were up to and looking at some of the awesome builds logged hereabouts.

So this is my first post on here and I hope someone can assist. I am gathering materials for a 1918 Trumpeter HMS Dreadnought with the assistance of Pontos and WEM add-ons designed for the Zvezda kit, and a few other bits and bobs.

The question concerns the anti-torpedo net fitments which I know were removed in 1915-16. However, despite careful perusal of various photographs and plans, I am yet to locate a definitive answer to the question of what was left attached to the hull after removal of the booms etc.

Were the net shelf and the boom attachment points removed entirely, or were some/all left in situ?

Hope someone can help.

Cheers, Jabb
bushman
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Utah, United States
Joined: October 08, 2007
KitMaker: 28 posts
Model Shipwrights: 19 posts
Posted: Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 06:03 AM UTC
Jabb,
Did you ever find out an answere to this question?
Ron
SpurnWater71
#504
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Florida, United States
Joined: July 06, 2019
KitMaker: 76 posts
Model Shipwrights: 73 posts
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 - 05:29 AM UTC
Using the Anatomy of the Ship series "The Battleship Dreadnought" as a reference and specifically comparing the external profiles A4/7 June 15 (with booms) and A4/8 (1918, no booms)it appears that the net boom sockets attached to the side of the ship were retained but the wood block and hinged hoop parts of the boom stowage chocks were taken off, leaving the two angle bar strips that held the wood blocks. Regarding the latter, note on figure A4/8, the pair of short diagonal lines at the level of the upper row of portholes (e.g. main deck level).

My interpretation (for what its worth) is that these diagonal lines represent the retained angle bars. If one lays a ruler on the drawing boom socket and lines it up the nearest pair of parallel lines in the aft direction, they correlate well, and this is correlation is consistent for each sock-chock pair along the ship side. The A4/8 profile (1918)also shows sockets & angle bar retained

The lower photo on page 56 gives a great view of both sockets and chocks in the 1908/1909 period. As to photographic evidence of the final configuration, the picture on page 64, (1916) is somewhat fuzzy and inconclusive as are the pictures on pages 67 & 68.

The brail davits were removed but the net shelf looks to have been retained through 1918.

Kip