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Rigging on non-wind powered ships
spongya
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MODELGEEK
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Posted: Wednesday, July 03, 2019 - 06:29 PM UTC
This is really a basic questions, so apologies in advance.

I was thinking of the presence of elaborate rigging on battleships that were powered by steam or oil, and could think of some reasons to have them:

1. antennae
2. for signal flags
3. stability for the masts, funnels
4. wires/cables for electrical equipment.

Were there any other reasons to have these ships rigged up? (The rigging seems to be extremely elaborate even on WWII battleships.)
Kevlar06
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Posted: Friday, July 05, 2019 - 03:37 AM UTC
I think you just about covered it with your description. There may be a narrow difference of opinion on wether or not antennas really count as "rigging" since they don't often act as supporting structures, whereas "rigging" does. But that's splitting hairs-- as modelers, we generally count all forms of wires and ropes as "rigging" for ship models-- because we have to "rig" them all anyway. Just to add some info here, there are all kinds of different antenna “rigging” depending on what radio gear is aboard ship— the more radios, telegraphs, radars, etc, the more “rigging” there will be. Those big WWII battleships could carry a lot more radio gear, hence more antenna “rigging”. It wasn’t just battleships—The Essex class aircraft carriers had an extensive, multiple antenna aerial rigging system that folded down almost the entire length of the starboard side of the ship. When standing upright, it resembled a series of high-tension power lines.
VR, Russ
SpurnWater71
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Posted: Friday, July 05, 2019 - 02:29 PM UTC
Your list is a very good start. Allow me to suggest some other types of rigging commonly found on warships without sails.

Rigging for lifting equipment: cranes, booms, derricks,davits, boat falls. Also lifts/hoists for accommodation ladders. Davits for replenishing and re-munitioning were numerous, and paravane rigging (both davits and the chains attached to the bow are particularly interesting items

Rigging for safety: foot ropes, rigging for floats & rafts, temporary safety ropes around open deck hatches. temporary safety ropes on weather decks in particularly bad weather

Rigging for comfort: awning rigging and associated davits - on weather decks and also open bridges

Rigging for bracing antennas, in particular, WWI long line antennas (and associated separators)

Working rigging (sheets, hauls) for towing boats, seaplanes, line throwing equipment, and rigging for underway ship replenishment

Ground tackle rigging: on small ships, to secure sheet or stern anchors. Anchor strops might be considered a form of rigging.

Mine warfare working rigging: rigging for Oropesa mine sweeping floats winches,and associated davits, or acoustic hammer rigging.

And lastly, decorative rigging: McNamara Lace, Flemish coils, lanyards, monkey fists (all but 1st have working uses too.

Hope this is value...
spongya
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Posted: Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 10:48 PM UTC
...

Ships are complex.

Thank you very much for the extensive response!
SpurnWater71
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Posted: Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 01:17 PM UTC
Complex Indeed!

You are most welcome - thanks for taking a moment to acknowledge the input.

With regards to battleships specifically, I consider the following to be signs of a modeler well-schooled in the rigging of battleships
1. Paravane rigging, including chains down to a forefoot skeg, and davits and rigging for swinging out the paravane itself.
2. WW1 battleship antenna spreaders and their braces & stiffners.
3. Small boats on davits properly rigged,including fore and aft quys and some semblance of block and tackle, not just a single line. Falls, painters, gripes, and the davit span with lifelines hanging coiled.
4. Accommodation ladders hanging on the side of a ship with proper davits and rigging "supporting" it from the weather deck above
5. One's eyes are drawn ensigns; a properly rigged gaff with vangs, guys, and a halyard looks great.

I will admit some bias for detail given that I model solely in 1/350. But would be really interested in hearing other's thoughts on what rigging defines a model ship as being created by a "salty modeler" as opposed to a "lubberly" modeler. What would you add to this list? What would you delete? Looking forward to your responses!

Kip
spongya
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Posted: Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 08:03 PM UTC
Well, as the Markgraf will be my first ship model, I think I will go with the "whatever I can install" school of building. I have a couple of drawings I found on a Russian forum on the rigging, and will do my darnest to replicate that.

I will probably glue more masts and rigging wire to my fingers than to each other.

We shall see.

I just hope I will not end up with a model of the ship in its present state.
SpurnWater71
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Posted: Saturday, July 13, 2019 - 03:43 AM UTC
Great Choice - I'm sure that whatever you chose to add will make it better.

I've found that WW1 battleships tend to have smaller superstructures and lack the AA weapons clutter of WW2 battleships - that is a plus when it comes to ease of rigging. On the other hand, the WW1 types have the long antennas, more derricks and booms, more spars and masts, and torpedo net rigging. Anything you chose to add will look great, I'm sure - look forward to your posting a picture.